Alternates,

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Flowers with Gems

I can’t believe we have just over a month left until In-Depth Night!  I feel like I’ve learned so much, and yet I still want to learn so much more.  Since my last post, I have had two meetings with my mentor.  During these sessions, we have continued to try out new nail art styles and have been polishing up on some old ones as well.  As nail art can often be a trial and error process, through these past few months, Sandi and I have gone through a variety of different concepts and alternatives with our designs.

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Pink/Purple/Blue Ombre

Two weeks ago, Sandi and I spent quite a bit of time working on ombre nail art.  I learned that the concept behind creating an ombre nail is actually quite simple.  We started by taping the area around the nail to prevent mess, then picked out three different polish colours, painted the base of the nail with the middle colour, painted a line of each colour onto a makeup sponge, before finally dabbing the sponge onto the nail.  After using this technique, we also came up with some different alternatives for various steps in the process.  For example, when I practiced ombre at home, I realized that certain colour combinations (ie. red, orange, and yellow) should begin with a base coat of the lightest polish, instead of the middle polish.  In terms of preparation, Sandi talked to me about the option to use a latex nail polish barrier around the nails instead of tape to prevent mess from the sponge.  However, we quickly decided against this option as the product is quite expensive, and latex allergies could be a concern for In-Depth Night.  Lastly, during our most recent meeting, Sandi showed me a way to blend colours before transferring them onto the sponge and later, the nail.  In this technique, a line of each colour gets painted onto a glass surface, such as a tile, and a toothpick is used to lightly blend the colours into eachother.  The sponge is then used to pick up the colour before again, dabbing it onto the nail.  I noticed that while this technique is useful to create a more unified blend (which is good for when you want a smooth transition between very different colours), it is more time consuming.  I can definitely see myself using this technique at home, but it might not be the most practical choice for In-Depth Night.

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Dragged Flowers

Another new skill we have started working on is dragged flowers.  Although we have previously spent time on a rose pattern, I wanted to learn a minimalistic flower design as well.  The design starts out with 5  dots placed in the shape of circle.  While the paint is still wet, a toothpick is used to drag a bit of each dot to the centre of the circle, creating a petal appearance.  Then, a different coloured dot or a gem can be used in the centre of the flower.  In my designs, I decided to add a couple additional dots to the nail to create a French tip effect.  In past posts, I have mentioned that an alternative to using nail polish is to use acrylic paint for nail art.  Sandi had brought up this alternative because often, nail polish is not opaque enough for designs to stand out.  Therefore, we’ve stuck to using paint for patterns in the past few sessions.  However, we noticed that this design actually turned out better with a polish.  Because this design includes dragging, the more watery and easy-to-be-manipulated polish is more effective.  It really helps to bring each petal to a point and also allows some of your base colour to show through.

Some of the smaller (but just as important) alternatives Sandi and I have thought about are as follows:

  • Popcorn
    • Add some yellow to the kernels to help distinguish the design as popcorn (as opposed to clouds)
    • Paint 1/3 of the nail red with white stripes to look like a popcorn box
  • Cherries
    • To easily create stems, mix the green paint with a little bit of water.  This will help the line “glide” when painting
  • Ombre
    • Use ombre colours as the basis of a design, for example, the base of a watermelon
    • Put design (like a flower) on top of the ombre
  • Dragged Flowers
    •  Place the flower near an edge, so that the design goes off the nail
    • Use two colours
      • Create a second dot flower within the first.  Then, when you drag the polish to a point, the colours will blend
      • Use a tiny brush to add small strokes of different colours to the inside of the flower
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Cherries

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Ombre with Dragged Flowers

Before my next session, I will continue to practice the designs I have learned so far and will play around with the alternatives for each.  Sandi has also asked me to come up with my 100% final list of designs I’d  like to work on before In-Depth Night.  While I had some decided for our last couple meetings, not everything was set in stone.  Now, I actually have to face the difficult decision of narrowing down my learning to a dozen, or less, designs.  I definitely understand why this is a good idea, but it will be hard for me have to set my focus to only a couple things, when there’s still so much out there to learn.
After this, my time will be spent strictly practicing all of the final designs for In-Depth Night.  I will need to work on my technique, my speed, and my organization of people for when they come to my station.  I’ll also need to figure out the most effective way to set up my learning centre, especially as it is going to be very hands on and I’ll need a lot of supplies spread out.  I’m really looking forward to In-Depth Night this year and am super excited to demonstrate all of the cool skills I’ve learned.  If you’re doing a stage performance and have time during the learning centres, be sure to head on over to my station to get a neat nail art demonstration!

One thought on “Alternates,

  1. You have learned a lot so far. Start thinking about how you are going to share this during in-depth night. Excellent analysis of this week’s De Bono’s concepts!
    Mulder

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